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Bubbles

Having been reading up about Sparkling Wine for Unit 5 of my diploma, I've been thinking more and more about bubbles recently.

My current understanding (certainly with Sparkling Wine) is that the bubbles of CO2 in a bottle of Sparkling Wine are cause by the gas dissolving under pressure and then being released when the bottle is opened and the pressure released. So what causes drinks to fizz up when you shake them?

I've had some explanations for why this should happen, but I'm not happy I fully understand*.

Any bubble experts out there who would care to enlighten me?

* - that said it's not something essential for me to understand.

Comments

nina321
20th Feb, 2007 17:58 (UTC)
it's all pressure.
IT's trying to react, because the air is in the liquid, but there's no room for the gas to be given off because the bottle is full with the co2.
So, when you open it, there's suddenly more room so the reaction that's been trying to happen previously, now can, and with more air than before, and so is more violent.

<3 chemistry!

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